4 Personality Types In Reaction To Winter Weather Stress

Stress, stress, stress. Who does not experience stress? We all experience stressful times in our life, and it is our personality type, our style in which how we react to those stressors that affect not just our own personal mental health and wellness. How our personality type reacts to stress affects those around us. As it is winter here in Massachusetts, where my counseling practice is based, winter weather and it’s conditions in how it affects people is a timely topic. Thus, I wanted to take a moment to write about how the winter weather conditions affect people in different ways. Below you will find what I have broken down as 4 personality reaction types to winter weather stress, and an example within each style. This particular blog article is meant to open up thought and insight for the reader to consider what their own style is, and to ask one’s self if one can consider being mindful of a healthier response. As our reaction style can be altered if we make that choice.

Rage Reaction Personality Style

Example, if you are feeling stressed because of the winter weather and the winter conditions (e.g., snow, ice) and you react in rage, others experience your wrath. Which ultimately hurts that relationship. Rather than calmly telling yourself; “this too shall pass”, you transfer your anger onto your child when he/she is simply acting like a child. Rather than having patience in the way in which you typically do with a build-up barometer in the Spring time that takes much more than just a whiney child to trigger your rage, during the winter months of having to deal with the leak in your house from the ice melting on your roof, your child’s whine leads to your outrage response.

So, your rage got the better of you. Plan: you can be in charge of your emotional reaction response.

Anxiety Reaction Personality Style

Example, if you are feeling anxious about the other drivers around you while you are on route during the snow, you may decide not to attend an important even that you promised your loved one you were going to attend.

So, your anxiety got the better of you. Plan: you can be in charge of your emotional reaction response.

Distracted Reaction Personality Style

Example, driving in winter weather conditions does not stop some people from texting or reading emails, yes, while driving. Being distracted, in essence, not paying attention fully to one’s environment while driving can absolutely effect your skill while driving potentially leading you to bump into the car in front of you causing a multiple car accident if there happen to be several distracted reaction types in a row.

So, your distraction got the better of you. Plan: you can be in charge of your emotional reaction response.

Denial Reaction Personality Style

Example, when there is ice and/or snow on the roads, one must truly drive slower. There are those who deny this and rather drive in their same style which can lead to an accident. Or, in your denial of the need for leaving earlier than per usual to get to a specified location, you leave too late and thus are frustrated, angry or upset that you are not going to be at your destination on time. Ultimately leading you to speed up while driving, cutting people off and getting into an accident. Or, perhaps you simply are in a grouchy mood when you get to your destination since you are late. Therefore affecting the relational experience between you and the person you were meeting up with.

So, your denial got the better of you. Plan: you can be in charge of your emotional reaction response.

If any of the above 4 reaction styles sound like you, consider what type of healthy style you would rather have. Then, consider what action steps you can take today and each day to move forward to live a healthier reaction style during these winter weather conditions.

If you found this article interesting and desire 3 tips to help you cope with your reaction response, check out my blog entitled: Snow Rage- Does Our Environment Effect Our Mood?

 

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